Danse l’Afrique Danse in Bamako, Mali 2010

Danse l’Afrique Danse is a platform for African contemporary choreographers- emerging and established. It is a meeting place for choreographers, dancers, presenters, programmers, cultural workers, researchers, and local contemporary dance audiences. It is a competition and launching platform for “new” choreographers where three winners have a pre-programmed tour in fifteen African countries and a European tour.

The 2010 Danse l’Afrique Danse was full of rich performances and exchange. There were over fifty performances- both for concert stage and site-specific works in the Bamako streets. The work ranged from highly physical dance theatre to contemplative installation works; all were engrained with social, personal, and political commentary and messages- at times abstract, at times very specific.

There were panels that discussed the now and future of African contemporary dance as well as feedback sessions for the younger choreographers presenting work. In the evenings we gathered at a local Bamako gathering spot, Rue Princesse to talk, share food, listen to live Malian music, and witness installation projects. The days began at 10am and ended at 4am.

As an America-based choreographer who has attended numerous festivals on the continent, I noticed a larger American, European, and African programming presence than previous years. There is a continued growing interest for contemporary art in Africa. Financing for the Festival came from the French government (Cultures France), The Mali Ministry of Culture, PUMA, and several other organizations. The judging panel consisted of three Africans and four Europeans. There was dialogue amongst the artists about the pros and cons of a contemporary dance competition and the European financing of an African dance competition.

This blog is a continuation of the trace of the powerful and important contemporary dance created by choreographers and dancers from the African continent. We have posted here short video excerpts “traces” that highlight excerpts of work from the Festival.

Respectfully submitted by: Esther Baker-Tarpaga

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Comments
  1. Elyse Morckel says:

    I really like the various pieces featured within this video montage it showed both contemporary and the post modern. It really breaks the image in what people think “African” dance is in today’s world. After watching the video with Opiyo Okash it also made me think about how people don’t categorize contemporary African dance with contemporary dance of the “west” or Asian contemporary dance.

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